Guinness Ice Cream

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It’s summer. Let’s make ice cream!

(Right?!?)

So last year, I made ice cream nonstop for about 4 months as I developed recipes for my new cookbook, Slushed. That’s this thing here:

It’s chock full of 150+ recipes for ice cream, gelato, sorbet, granita, and frozen cocktails.

You’d think I’d be sick of the stuff by now.

Not so much. Sigh.

So, this ice cream is a classic at The Mouse House, and puts our favorite stout to work in the frostiest of forms.

Guinness is actually one of the four basic food groups for The Angry Chef, so needless to say, we drink a lot of it—and cook with it almost as much.

(Don’t believe me? Take a peek at some of our favorites, from short ribs and hearty stew to homemade mustard and ice cream floats.)

For this ice cream, I like to use the extra stout, which has a deeper, richer flavor.

A candy thermometer is your secret weapon for homemade ice cream

I always use a candy thermometer when I make ice cream. Here’s why.

Eggs are cooked and safe to eat at 160 degrees. Custard will generally start to break at about 180 degrees. You want your custard cooked, but you don’t want it overcooked. A candy thermometer takes all the guesswork out of knowing when it’s done. (Check out more tips in my cookbook.)

Granted, once you’ve made about a dozen quarts of ice cream, you’ll most likely be able to eyeball your custard and know when it’s ready. Until then, a candy thermometer is indispensable, especially for beginners.

You can find an inexpensive candy thermometer at most major home goods stores, or order one from Amazon.

Make this the day before

Because of the alcohol content in this ice cream, it will take longer to freeze solid. Make this ice cream the day before you want to serve it. It needs to freeze overnight to set up properly.

Guinness Ice Cream

3/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
6 egg yolks
2 cups heavy cream
1 1/2 cups Guinness Extra Stout or regular Guinness (one 11–12-oz. bottle)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Makes about 1 quart

Make the custard base

Put the sugar and salt in a medium-sized, heavy bottomed pot.

Toss in the egg yolks.

Whisk them together until uniform.

Add the heavy cream and whisk again until uniform.

Set the pot on the stove over medium heat. Cook, whisking constantly.

(Seriously, don’t walk away from the pot. You have to keep the mixture moving as it heats up, or else you’ll wind up with a pot of scrambled eggs.)

Your mixture is ready when it thickly coats the back of spoon and reaches 170 degrees on a candy thermometer. (To measure, tip the pot so that the egg mixture is deep, so you get a good reading on your thermometer.) This should take 3 or 4 minutes, depending on your stove.

Strain the mixture

Strain the mixture into a large bowl to catch any bits of stray egg that managed to cook.

Like these. (Ew, right? You don’t want those in your finished ice cream.)

Finish the ice cream mixture

Add the stout.

Toss in the vanilla extract. (I make my own. Learn how here. It’s SO easy. All you need is vodka, vanilla beans, and a little patience. I’ve had my bottle going for 10 years, no joke.)

Whisk gently until uniform.

Give the mixture a taste. This is your finished flavor. If you want to add more vanilla, etc., do it now.

Chill the mixture

Chill the mixture until completely cold, about 4-6 hours.

If you need to, you can fudge this a little by putting it in a shallow pan (like a lasagna pan) and sticking it in the freezer. Just keep a good eye on it, and don’t let it remotely freeze solid.

Process the ice cream

Once it’s chilled, process the mixture in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. (Every machine is a little different.)

Because of the alcohol content, your ice cream will still be a little loose when it’s done. That’s just fine. It will set up in the freezer over night.

Freeze overnight

When it’s done, pour it into a freezer-safe container. I like to use 1-lb. bread pans. They hold a quart of ice cream perfectly.

Press a piece of plastic wrap to the surface of the ice cream.

Pop it into the freezer. Freeze overnight, until solid.

Serve & enjoy

Scoop away! We actually love to make Guinness floats with this. It’s also out of this world with fudge-y chocolate cake.

Craving Guinness + ice cream RIGHT NOW?

Make a Guinness float. They’re really easy and a mainstay at Boston’s Irish pubs in the summer. Here’s how.

Want more booze in your ice cream?

Check out my cookbook, Slushed!

It’s packed with more than 150 recipes for ice cream laced with all your favorite liquors and cordials.

Never made ice cream before? No problem.

I included an extensive primer on ice cream basics. I even have a method for making ice cream without an ice cream machine. All you need is a lasagna pan, a whisk, and a little elbow grease.

Happy churning!

Guinness Ice Cream

Yields About 1 quart

Here's how to make ice cream out of classic Guinness stout (or your favorite stout!)

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Ingredients

3/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
6 egg yolks
2 cups heavy cream
1 1/2 cups Guinness Extra Stout or regular Guinness (one 11–12-oz. bottle)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Makes about 1 quart

Instructions

  1. Put the sugar and salt in a medium-sized, heavy bottomed pot.
  2. Toss in the egg yolks.
  3. Whisk them together until uniform.
  4. Add the heavy cream and whisk again until uniform.
  5. Set the pot on the stove over medium heat. Cook, whisking constantly.
  6. Your mixture is ready when it thickly coats the back of spoon and reaches 170 degrees on a candy thermometer. (To measure, tip the pot so that the egg mixture is deep, so you get a good reading on your thermometer.) This should take 3 or 4 minutes, depending on your stove.
  7. Strain the mixture into a large bowl to catch any bits of stray egg that managed to cook.
  8. Add the stout.
  9. Toss in the vanilla extract. Whisk gently until uniform.
  10. Give the mixture a taste. This is your finished flavor. If you want to add more vanilla, etc., do it now. Chill the mixture in the fridge until it's cold.
  11. Once it’s chilled, process the mixture in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Because of the alcohol content, your ice cream will still be a little loose when it’s done. That’s just fine. It will set up in the freezer over night.
  12. When it’s done, pour it into a freezer-safe container. I like to use 1-lb. bread pans. They hold a quart of ice cream perfectly.
  13. Press a piece of plastic wrap to the surface of the ice cream.
  14. Pop it into the freezer. Freeze overnight, until solid.
  15. Scoop away! We actually love to make Guinness floats with this. It’s also out of this world with fudge-y chocolate cake. Enjoy!
http://www.thehungrymouse.com/2012/06/23/guinness-ice-cream/

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Jessie Cross is a cookbook author and creator of The Hungry Mouse, a monster online food blog w/500+ recipes. When she's not shopping for cheese or baking pies, Jessie serves as an Associate Creative Director at PARTNERS+simons, a boutique ad agency in Boston. She lives in Salem, Massachusetts with her husband and two small, fluffy wolves.

12 COMMENTS

  1. Looks good! I tried Guinness when I was in Ireland in May…I can’t say I liked it, because I like my drinks sweet. But I want to try this!!

    Also, my mother and I do the same thing for vanilla. She bought a bottle of Smirnoff Vanilla Vodka and we put our used vanilla beans in it. It smells sooo good

  2. Oh my! This is a real must try to such a Guinness lover like me! :)) Great idea Jessie! Wish we had guinness sold at every corner buffet :)))) Thanks for the recipe!

  3. There is nothing that can be compared to home made ice cream. I simply cannot resist that temptation, so I am going to prepare some for my friends in the weekend. Thanks!

  4. Made the ice cream this week — instructions are great with pictures! The ice cream was AWESOME! Instead of vanilla extract I used the entire contents of a vanilla bean. The vanilla added a heady fragrance and the Guinness gave a savory quality that made it just incredible. Thank you so much!

  5. It’s the middle of winter…in Maine and I’m going to make this recipe! For a nice contrast to the smooth Guinness flavor mix in some broken up Ginger Snaps when serving.

  6. I first had Guiness® ice cream in Grenada. They call the flavour “Power”. It had chocolate fudge swirls with salted peanuts and possibly malt(?) plus the Guiness®. To die for! May have to tweak this recipe a bit to try to relive my island experience.

    • I’m Grenadian and the original Power icecream does not have peanuts in it actually, that was an added ingredient on something old. Power is the best and my favorite. Did u get it from Rickys?

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