How to Cook Chanterelle Mushrooms

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Hands down, chanterelle mushrooms are one of my favorite mushrooms on the planet.

Let’s talk about chanterelle mushrooms, how to buy them, and how to store and cook them once you get them home.   

What are chanterelle mushrooms?

Chanterelle mushrooms, or Cantharellus cibarius, range in color from golden, buttery yellow to darker orange on the outside with a creamy white interior.  

You can forage them (if you know how to identify them), or find them in higher-end grocery stores and natural markets. 

They can grow over 5 inches long, but most average a few inches in length.  

Chanterelle mushrooms are highly sought after by chefs and home cooks.

You can only buy them seasonally (August – December), since they need to be wild foraged. They only grow on live trees, and aren’t cultivated.  

They’re prized for their delicate flavor. Both the stems and caps are edible. 

Nutritionally, chanterelle mushrooms are high in fiber, and contain vitamin B and D–and some trace minerals, as well.

How to buy chanterelle mushrooms

Chanterelles are in season between August and December. 

Look for mushrooms that are firm with no soft spots.

You want them to be on the dry side. A wet chanterelle is either getting old or has been stored improperly (and is a victim of condensation). 

I found these guys at my local Whole Foods this weekend. 

They’re not cheap, but they’re totally worth it for a treat. 

How to store chanterelles

Because you don’t want them to get wet, mushy, and moldy, don’t store them in plastic or covered in plastic wrap. 

Keep them in a cardboard box like this, or in a brown paper bag.

Putting them in a colander and loosely covering them with a paper towel also works. 

Basically, you want air circulation around them.

Buy them within a day or two of when you want to use them. They’re best fresh.  

Chanterelle mushrooms pair really well with pan-seared or roasted meats

You guys know we’re huge carnivores.

I love to pair sautéed chanterelle mushrooms with really good meat. 

This time, I served them with some thick, grass-fed New York sirloin steaks from our favorite local farm, Tendercrop

I dusted them in mesquite spices and then seared them quickly in organic avocado oil (my new fav oil…good for you with a pretty neutral flavor and high smoke point).

How to cook chanterelle mushrooms

Put 2 – 3 Tablespoons of butter in a large nonstick pan. 

Pop the pan on the stove over medium-high heat to melt it.. 

Gently brush off any dirt on the mushrooms with a damp paper towel. 

Slice larger chanterelle mushrooms in half, and leave the smaller ones whole.  

Let the butter cook for a minute or two, until it starts to smell nutty and brown a little.  

Toss your chanterelles in into the hot butter. 

Stir with a spatula or wooden spoon to coat with butter. 

Cook for 5-10 minutes on medium-high heat, stirring frequently, until nicely browned.

I yanked them when they looked like this. 

Enjoy!

Serve them immediately.  

Do you like chanterelles?

Do you forage for them? How do you prepare them? What do you like to serve them with? 

Drop us a comment below, we’d love to hear from you!

Nutrition

Brown Butter Chanterelle Mushrooms

Sumptuous chanterelle mushrooms sautéed in brown butter make a delicious side dish.

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Ingredients

2-3 Tablespoons butter
1 lb. fresh chanterelle mushrooms

Instructions

  1. Put 2 - 3 Tablespoons of butter in a large nonstick pan. Pop the pan on the stove over medium-high heat to melt it. 
  2. Gently brush off any dirt on the mushrooms with a damp paper towel. Slice larger chanterelle mushrooms in half, and leave the smaller ones whole.  
  3. Let the butter cook for a minute or two, until it starts to smell nutty and brown a little.  
  4. Toss your chanterelle mushrooms in into the hot butter. Stir with a spatula or wooden spoon to coat with butter. 
  5. Cook for 5-10 minutes on medium-high heat, stirring frequently, until nicely browned.
  6. Serve them immediately. 
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http://www.thehungrymouse.com/2019/11/17/how-to-cook-chanterelle-mushrooms/

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Jessie Cross is a cookbook author and creator of The Hungry Mouse, a monster online food blog w/500+ recipes. When she's not shopping for cheese or baking pies, Jessie works as an advertising copywriter in Boston. She lives in Salem, Massachusetts with her husband and two small, fluffy wolves.

1 COMMENT

  1. i was a bad cook last year but after searching on internet about recipes now i know and have learnt to differentiate between main course appetizers and all these kind of recipe i really loved it and thank you alot for contributing indirectly in my life :) love the recipe :)

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