Port Wine Macerated Strawberries & A Trip To Wilhelm Farmstand

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Port Wine Macerated Strawberries at The Hungry Mouse

Recently, my mom and I were driving around in the country, and found ourselves in the northwest corner of Connecticut, in the town of Granby. It’s a sleepy little farm town with a handful of hidden culinary gems. Wilhelm Farm’s roadside stand is one of them. When we passed by, we knew had to stop and sniff around a little. Here’s a peek at the farmstand—plus a quick recipe for strawberries macerated in port wine.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

The farmstand is on the side of a fairly main road.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

It’s set on the edge of a large field.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

You know what they say: Less is more. Since it’s the beginning of the season, the pickings were fairly lean—but what they did have out was clearly fresh from the field and looked utterly mouthwatering.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

There were two rows of plump and rosy native strawberries.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

We wound up taking 2 quarts home with us.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

I can’t wait for the native strawberries to come out each year. The flavor is so much more intense and sweet than your run-of-the-mill supermarket berry.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

They also had a handful of rhubarb stalks.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

And a shelf with a few rows of jewel-toned, homemade jams.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

This farmstand is like many in this area—charming, unmanned, and run on the honor system.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

We dropped our money in, and went on our way. Before the day was done, we wound our way through the hills, by way of both a goat farm and a garlic farm. (More on both those to come soon.)

Oh! We also drove by the majestic Granby Oak, which has to be the most impressive tree I’ve ever seen in my life.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

It’s more than 400 years old and spreads out over 130 feet.

Farm Stand Pictures at The Hungry Mouse

Ah, strawberries

Now, I could have done any number of things with these berries—like make a Strawberry Brunch Tart with Thyme and Black Pepper

Strawberry Brunch Tart at The Hungry Mouse

…or a Strawberries and Cream Cake.

Strawberries and Cream Cake at The Hungry Mouse

But I was struck with a serious—and rather urgent—case of berry greed. (I am, after all, a rather hungry mouse.) So I sliced them up and macerated them with a little bit of tawny port and sugar.

Port Wine Macerated Strawberries at The Hungry Mouse

While it may sound like an unlikely pairing, the flavor of the port really brings out the sweetness in the berries.

Port Wine Macerated Strawberries at The Hungry Mouse

Spoon these over vanilla ice cream or a thick slice of angel food cake. Or, you know, just eat them with a spoon.

Port Wine Macerated Strawberries at The Hungry Mouse

Port Wine Macerated Strawberries

2 quarts strawberries, sliced
3 Tbls. sugar
3 Tbls. tawny port

Nip off the leaves and stems, then slice up your strawberries. Put them in a large bowl.

Port Wine Macerated Strawberries at The Hungry Mouse

Toss in the sugar and the port.

Port Wine Macerated Strawberries at The Hungry Mouse
Toss gently to combine.
Port Wine Macerated Strawberries at The Hungry Mouse

Let the berries sit on the counter for maybe 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Port Wine Macerated Strawberries at The Hungry Mouse
As they sit, they’ll start to give off all sorts of lovely juice.

Port Wine Macerated Strawberries at The Hungry Mouse

After about 20 minutes, your sliced berries will be soaking in gloriously fragrant syrup.

Port Wine Macerated Strawberries at The Hungry Mouse
Serve over vanilla ice cream or thick slices of angel food cake. (Or just have at it with a spoon.)

Port Wine Macerated Strawberries at The Hungry Mouse

Enjoy!

Passing through Northern Connecticut? Visit Wilhem Farm.

Here’s where to get your own berries. (I probably don’t have any left.) Wilhelm Farm is owned by Ann Wilhelm and Bill Bentley. It’s located at 329 North Granby Road, Granby, CT.

View 329 N Granby Rd in a larger map

Cheers!

 

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Jessie Cross is a cookbook author and creator of The Hungry Mouse, a monster online food blog w/500+ recipes. When she's not shopping for cheese or baking pies, Jessie serves as an Associate Creative Director at PARTNERS+simons, a boutique ad agency in Boston. She lives in Salem, Massachusetts with her husband and two small, fluffy wolves.

9 COMMENTS

  1. Nothing like buying fresh produce right from the farmer! Those strawberries look heavenly!

    When we lived in Western NY, I used to love buying double yolk eggs from a farmer who lived 10 miles away. Like your farmer, he too used a payment pail and it heartened me to know that there were still places where one could trust in the good of one’s neighbors.

    • Wheee! Totally couldn’t agree more. Love hitting the farm stands. And oh my goodness…farm fresh eggs? Yes, please. Such a huge difference in taste. Yum!

      +Jessie

  2. Those are some great looking strawberries! I have been to a few parts of western CT in fact Granby is not far from Hurley’s hometown. I have seen farm stand and Hurley is always telling me how fresh farm goods are far better tasting than what you normally buy at the supermarkets.

  3. in 1980 I was introduced to an insanely delicious strawberry dip made of whipped cream, cream cheese, port wine and a dash of cognac. The flavors meshed so well I later tried adding port to strawberries I was macerating for shortcake and that’s the way I’ve made strawberry anything ever since. Port and strawberries are made for each other!

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