Marmalade Souffles (Plus Tips for Making a Perfect Souffle)

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Finished souffle

I haven’t made a souffle in a really long time.

Contrary to popular belief, souffles are actually pretty easy to make. You just need to follow a few rules—and not breakdance in the kitchen when they’re in the oven.

(One of my souffles did flop on me, but it was totally my fault. Read on and you’ll see why.)

Souffles in the oven

This particular souffle recipe comes from the good folks at Fine Cooking magazine, and features orange marmalade—one of my favorite substances on the planet.

(I swear I don’t eat it straight out of the jar. Most of the time.)

Spoon in marmalade jar

These souffles get a triple dose of citrus flavor from a syrupy mixture of marmalade, orange liqueur, and lemon juice.

Marmalade up close

The tops bake into beautiful, almost-chewy meringues that are rimmed with little bits of crunchy sugar.

The insides are soft, airy orange-scented bliss shot through with bits of candylike rind.

An added bonus? This recipe qualifies as gluten free.

High rise souffle

Souffle ingredients

Now, this recipe only has a handful of ingredients. Sugar. Marmalade, of course. I like Bonne Maman brand, but use any kind you like. Orange liqueur. (I used Triple Sec, but Cointreau would be good, too.)

Close up of orange marmalade

Lemon juice. Egg whites. Cream of tartar.

What is cream of tartar?

Cream of tartar is most often used in the kitchen to stabilize egg whites as you beat them and give them more volume.

It also finds its way into candies and frostings to help keep them nice and creamy.

Cream of tartar label

Where does cream of tartar come from? It’s actually (drum roll, please) a byproduct of making wine.

Wine?

Yep, wine. (Potassium bitartrate from the grapes crystallizes on the insides of wine casks.)

Most American markets will keep it with the spices or the baking supplies. It’s white powdery stuff and comes in a small jar.

Cream of tartar

What makes a souffle rise?

I’m oversimplifying a little, but two things make a souffle rise: Air and protein.

When you beat the egg whites, you’re incorporating lots of air into them.

These air bubbles will expand in the oven and cause your souffle to rise.

The heat from the oven will also stabilize the protein in the whites, which gives the souffle its (albeit fragile) structure.

8 tips for making a perfect souffle

Here are some tips that will improve your chances of souffle success:

  1. Make them, then serve them. Souffles need to be served hot out of the oven.
  2. Bring the egg whites to room temperature before you beat them. They’ll take more air that way. (More air = more height.)
  3. Carefully separate your egg whites from the yolks. Any traces of fat from the yolks will keep the whites from beating up properly.
  4. Use a very (very, very) clean bowl to whip your whites.
  5. Be sure to beat the egg whites long enough. That means to stiff peaks (not soft peaks). But don’t overbeat them to the point where they get grainy (you can actually destabilize that network of air bubbles you worked so hard to create).
  6. Fold the egg whites into the marmalade mixture gently. (Don’t stir it. Don’t beat it. You don’t want to deflate the whites.)
  7. Test the souffles for doneness by inserting a metal skewer into them. Like testing a cake, the skewer should come out clean, not covered in egg-y mixture.
  8. Don’t jump around in the kitchen when the souffles are in the oven.

All that said, sometimes your souffle will flop

I said earlier that one of my souffles flopped—and that it was my fault. It was.

This recipe makes six individual souffles.

Now, I only have four ramekins at home. (You see where this is going.)

I made the full recipe, and figured I’d just bake them a little longer. Turns out, I filled one too much and didn’t bake it long enough.

Three of my souffles came out well. The fourth—one that got a little more of the souffle mixture than the others—flopped.

I would have known this was going to happen—if I tested them with a metal skewer. Which I didn’t.

So two strikes against The Mouse.

I did, however, wind up with three perfectly lovely souffles, so I’m still considering this a victory.

Fallen souffle

The moral of the story? Use this recipe, but follow the instructions and fill six ramekins. (Six. Not four. Sigh.)

Marmalade Souffles

Recipe from Fine Cooking magazine

Butter
3 Tbls. sugar + more for the ramekins
2/3 cup marmalade
1 Tbls. lemon juice
1 Tbls. triple sec
2 egg whites
pinch of cream of tartar (about 1/16th of a teaspoon or so)

Makes 6 individual soufflees (in 6 oz. ramekins)

How to position your oven racks

Do this first. It’ll only take a sec, and you won’t want to stop to do it once the souffles are ready to go into the oven.

You’re going to bake the souffles on the bottom rack. Move the top rack so that you give your souffles about six inches of headroom.

Preheat your oven to 425 degrees.

Position your oven racks to bake the souffles

Coat the ramekins with butter and sugar

Grab your ramekins. Generously butter the insides, making sure to get in all the corners.

Butter the ramekins

Put a spoonful of sugar in one.

Spoon sugar into the ramekins

Roll the sugar around in the ramekin until it coats the bottom and sides.

Coat the ramekins with sugar

When it’s coated, tap the excess sugar out. (Tap the sugar out over the next ramekin to use up all the sugar.)

Repeat until you’ve coated all the buttered ramekins.

Ramekin coated with butter and sugar

As the souffle rises in the oven, a little bit of this sugar will stick to the edges, providing a really nice texture and crunch.

Make marmalade mixture

Put the marmalade into a large mixing bowl.

Marmalade in a bowl

Add the lemon juice and orange liqueur to the bowl.

Teaspoon of lemon juice

Drizzle the lemon juice into the bowl

Whisk it all together until it’s uniform.

Whisk the marmalade mixture

Like this. Set it aside while you deal with the egg whites.

Lemony marmalade mixture

Beat the egg whites to stiff peaks

Measure out your sugar and set it aside.

Sugar in a red bowl

Put the egg whites in the bowl of your mixer—or in a large mixing bowl if you’re using a handheld mixer or beating by hand.

(I started mine out in my KitchenAid, then switched to beating by hand because my whisk attachment wasn’t quite getting to the bottom of the bowl…two egg whites isn’t a lot.)

Be sure that you don’t get any yolk in the whites.

The fat in the yolks will keep them from poofing up properly.

Put the egg whites in the bowl of the mixer

Toss in a pinch of cream of tartar. Beat the egg whites until they’re frothy.

Beat egg whites until frothy

When they start to get thick and opaque, start to sprinkle in the sugar little by little, beating as you go.

You should notice the whites increase in volume and get glossy.

Beat the sugar into the egg whites

Stop beating when they hold a stiff peak, like this. (A stiff peak will stand up straight. A soft peak will flop over.)

Egg whites and sugar beaten to stiff glossy peaks

Fold the beaten egg whites into the marmalade

Scoop about a third of your beaten egg whites into the bowl with the marmalade mixture.

Beaten egg whites and marmalade

Gently fold them in. Use a light hand.

The goal is to knock as little air out of the egg whites as possible. (Less air = less poof when they bake.)

Fold the egg whites in to the mixture

When you’ve incorporated the egg whites, fold in another third.

Egg whites and marmalade folded together

Fold in more beaten egg whites

Then fold in the last third.

Add the last of the egg whites to the mixture

Your finished mixture should look about like this.

Marmalade souffle mixture

Fill each ramekin about halfway. Use all six ramekins.

Don’t overfill them. (Remember my flopped souffle above.)

Fill the ramekins half full

Bake the souffles

Put the ramekins on a sheet pan. Pop the pan into your preheated, 425-degree oven.

Bake for 12-15 minutes, until the top is a nutty brown color.

Put the souffles in the oven

As they bake, they’ll start to poof up.

The souffles will begin to rise

And poof…

Souffles rising in the oven

…and poof (it’s that tall one on the back right that flopped on me)…

Souffles baking in the oven

They’re done when the top looks about like this.

Brown top of souffle

Serve them immediately.

Side view of souffle

Enjoy!

Spoonful of marmalade souffle

Nutrition

Calories

116 cal

Carbs

17 g

Protein

13 g
Click Here For Full Nutrition, Exchanges, and My Plate Info

Serves 4-6

Marmalade Souffles (Plus Tips for Making a Perfect Souffle)

Contrary to popular belief, souffles are actually pretty easy to make. You just need to follow a few rules—and not breakdance in the kitchen when they're in the oven. These souffles get a triple dose of citrus flavor from a syrupy mixture of marmalade, orange liqueur, and lemon juice. The tops bake into beautiful, almost-chewy meringues that are rimmed with little bits of crunchy sugar. The insides are soft, airy orange-scented bliss shot through with bits of candylike rind.

Save RecipeSave Recipe

Ingredients

Butter
3 Tbls. sugar + more for the ramekins
2/3 cup marmalade
1 Tbls. lemon juice
1 Tbls. triple sec
2 egg whites
pinch of cream of tartar (about 1/16th of a teaspoon or so)

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Grab your ramekins. Generously butter the insides, making sure to get in all the corners. Put a spoonful of sugar in one. Roll the sugar around in the ramekin until it coats the bottom and sides. When it's coated, tap the excess sugar out. (Tap the sugar out over the next ramekin to use up all the sugar.) Repeat until you've coated all the buttered ramekins.
  3. Put the marmalade into a large mixing bowl. Add the lemon juice and orange liqueur to the bowl. Whisk it all together until it's uniform.
  4. Put the egg whites in the bowl of your mixer—or in a large mixing bowl if you're using a handheld mixer or beating by hand. Toss in a pinch of cream of tartar. Beat the egg whites until they're frothy. When they start to get thick and opaque, start to sprinkle in the sugar little by little, beating as you go. You should notice the whites increase in volume and get glossy. Stop beating when they hold a stiff peak. (A stiff peak will stand up straight. A soft peak will flop over.)
  5. Scoop about a third of your beaten egg whites into the bowl with the marmalade mixture.
  6. Gently fold them in. Use a light hand. The goal is to knock as little air out of the egg whites as possible. (Less air = less poof when they bake.)
  7. When you've incorporated the egg whites, fold in another third.
  8. Then fold in the last third.
  9. Fill each ramekin about halfway. Use all six ramekins. Don't overfill them.
  10. Put the ramekins on a sheet pan. Pop the pan into your preheated, 425-degree oven. Bake for 12-15 minutes, until the top is a nutty brown color.
  11. Serve them immediately. Enjoy!
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Jessie Cross is a cookbook author and creator of The Hungry Mouse, a monster online food blog w/500+ recipes. When she's not shopping for cheese or baking pies, Jessie works as an advertising copywriter in Boston. She lives in Salem, Massachusetts with her husband and two small, fluffy wolves.

6 COMMENTS

  1. I want to make these now....right now. They look delicious - I love marmalade and a souffle - these are the perfect storm. Great pics and a great recipe - thanks for the inspiration.
  2. Absolutely fabulous! I can't wait to try these! I have a jar of Bonne Maman orange marmalade that I too never - ever - just eat straight fromt he jar. I may have to repurpose some to this recipe!
  3. Great soufflé tips! Would like to see a *Main-Course* variant. "In My Day" we were taught that you needed a copper bowl if you were serious about soufflés.
  4. This looks so delicious! I wanted to let you know that I have used one of your gorgeous marmalade pictures in my blog, but I've credited you and linked back to your blog. Please let me know if you would rather I removed it and I'd be happy to oblige.
  5. I am seventy, but will never forget Mrs. Merton, an housekeeper employed by my Father, a widower, to look after the two of us. Amongst her many talents, Mrs. Merton was a trained Vienese chef. This would appear for dessert regularly. She taught me a great deal, but not this one as I of course, was required during her preperation of dessert at table with Father. You have just now made it possible for me to revisit this exquisite dessert. I cannot tell you how grateful I am to you for turning this beloved memory into a reality. Thank you.

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