Bone-In Holiday Prime Rib

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Looking for a way to fancy up dinner for friends and family on New Year’s Eve (or any holiday, for that matter)?

Try our holiday prime rib.

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Take a bone-in prime rib, slice the bones off in one single rack (or have your butcher do this), then stack the meat on top of the ribs and roast it.

The result is a succulent, super impressive centerpiece that’s fit for a king’s table.

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Cooking the ribs like this means that you still get to nibble on those gorgeous bones, but carving the beast at the table is a breeze.

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I followed the basic recipe for my Restaurant-Style Prime Rib, which gives your roast a glorious crust AND evenly cooked meat on the inside (as opposed to well-done on the outside and rare on the inside).

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Hands down, it’s my favorite way to cook a prime rib, and this post will teach you my method.

(Hint: It’s more method than exact recipe, so bean counters, beware!)

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The short version of the recipe goes like this

Basically, you sear the outside in a pan on the stove, then roast the beast for about 3 1/2 hours (a little less for rare, a little more for well done) in the oven at 250 degrees F.

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Sounds way too low, right?

It’s not. Trust me. I’ve been cooking prime rib like this for years.

That’s it.

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What size prime rib should I get?

Portions are approximate, right?

You never know when Uncle Larry is going to demolish half a roast by himself.

Barring the occasional overly enthusiastic diner, count on roughly (raw weights listed below):

4 lbs. for 3-4 people
5 lbs. for 4-5 people
6 lbs. for 5-6 people
7 lbs. for 6-7 people
10 lbs. for 8-10 people
14 lbs. for 10-12 people

How do I know when it’s done?

Use a meat thermometer. I’m not big on gadgets, but a good meat thermometer is worth having, especially when a big, expensive hunk of meat is on the line.

If you don’t have one, grab one at any hardware store or on Amazon.

You just spent a bunch of money on your holiday roast, $12 for a little insurance it will be done right is well worth it.

So, your roast will continue to increase in temperature (called carry-over cooking) when it comes out of the oven, so yank it when it registers 5 – 10 degrees below what you want to serve it at.

For example, we like our meat rare.

I yank my roasts around 110 degrees F, and they raise almost perfectly to 120 degrees F once they sit on the counter for about 15 minutes.

Temperature chart
121°-125° F = rare
130°-135° F = medium-rare
140° F = medium
150° F = medium-well
160° F = well done

Are you ready? To the ovens!

Bone-In Holiday Prime Rib

1 prime rib of beef, with ribs (varying weights, see my note on servings above)
olive oil
salt
pepper
garlic powder
fresh rosemary

Prep your prime rib

So, our butcher was kind enough to trim the ribs off our roast.

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But if your roast has its ribs attached, simply slice along the top of the ribs with a very sharp knife.

You want to separate the ribs from the main part of the roast, like this:

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Preheat your oven to 250 degrees F.

Line a sheet pan with foil or parchment paper (for easier clean up) and set a rack on it.

Put it aside while you sear the roast.

Sear the roast and the ribs

Set a large pan with some olive oil in it on the stove over high heat.

Sprinkle the roast and ribs liberally with salt on all sides.

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Sear the roast on all sides. Put on a fan and throw open a window, you’re going to make some smoke.

(All in the name of a fabulous feast!) Don’t be afraid of the heat, but adjust your temp down if you see it’s starting to burn (not brown).

You’re aiming for a nice brown crust on all sides.

That crust is pure flavor.

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When your roast is browned on all sides, pull it out of the pan and set it on a plate.

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Next, sear the ribs on all sides the same way.

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When the ribs are done, yank them out of the pan and set them on your prepared sheet pan, slopey side up.

So now, you should have this situation on your counter:

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Truss the prime rib

Take the roast and nestle it on top of the ribs, fat side UP, like this.

By cooking it fat side facing up, the fat will melt and baste the meat as it roasts.

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With kitchen twine, secure the roast to the ribs.

You can get fancy about how you tie it, I just go around a handful of times and tie a bow.

The goal is to keep the meat from sliding off the ribs.

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Season the roast

Pour some water in the bottom of the pan, enough that the entire bottom is covered.

If you like, throw some whiskey in for good measure (and extra flavor).

Sprinkle the roast with a little more salt, some black pepper, garlic powder, and dot with fresh rosemary.

These are classic, beefy flavors, but by all means switch up the spices and get creative if you want.

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Roast the prime rib

Pop the pan into your preheated, 250-degree F oven.

Roast uncovered for about 3 hours.

No basting, no extra anything. That’s it.

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Start checking the temperature after about 2 1/2 hours.

Better to check too early than too late ;).

You want to insert the meat thermometer as close to the dead center of the roast as you can get.

This helps ensure the most accurate temp.

I yanked my roast at 120 degrees F for a finished medium rare roast.

If you want your roast really rare (I’m talking almost still moo-ing), pull it at 110 degrees F, or even a hair under.

(See my note up top about carry over cooking.)

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Tent the prime rib

Set your roast on a rack on the counter, and tent him loosely with foil. Let him rest like this for about 15 minutes to help keep him nice and juicy.

He’ll rise to his final temperature under the foil (check it again with a meat thermometer if you like before slicing).

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Plate, carve, and inhale!

And…you did it! Not so bad, right?

The oven truly does most of the work. When your roast is at his final temperature, transfer him to a serving platter.

Cut off his strings and discard.

For a nice presentation, surround him with roasted veggies or some fresh sprigs of rosemary.
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As far as serving goes, I like to ask people if they want one thick slice or a bunch of thinner slices.

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Enjoy!

From all of us at The Hungry Mouse, we hope you have a wonderful holiday season and a very happy new year!

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Bone-In Holiday Prime Rib Roast

This is a succulent, super impressive centerpiece that’s fit for a king’s table.

Save RecipeSave Recipe

Ingredients

1 prime rib of beef, with ribs (varying weights, see my note on servings below)
olive oil
salt
pepper
garlic powder
fresh rosemary

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 250 degrees F. Line a sheet pan with foil or parchment paper (for easier clean up) and set a rack on it. Put it aside while you sear the roast.
  2. If your roast has its ribs attached, simply slice along the top of the ribs with a very sharp knife. You want to separate the ribs from the main part of the roast.
  3. Set a large pan with some olive oil in it on the stove over high heat. Sprinkle the roast and ribs liberally with salt on all sides.
  4. Sear the roast on all sides. Put on a fan and throw open a window, you’re going to make some smoke.
  5. When your roast is browned on all sides, pull it out of the pan and set it on a plate.
  6. Next, sear the ribs on all sides the same way.
  7. When the ribs are done, yank them out of the pan and set them on your prepared sheet pan, slopey side up.
  8. Take the roast and nestle it on top of the ribs, fat side UP.
  9. With kitchen twine, secure the roast to the ribs. You can get fancy about how you tie it, I just go around a handful of times and tie a bow. The goal is to keep the meat from sliding off the ribs.
  10. Pour some water in the bottom of the pan, enough that the entire bottom is covered.
  11. Sprinkle the roast with a little more salt, some black pepper, garlic powder, and dot with fresh rosemary.
  12. Pop the pan into your preheated, 250-degree F oven. Roast uncovered for about 3 hours. No basting, no extra anything. That’s it.
  13. Start checking the temperature after about 2 1/2 hours: 121°-125° F = rare, 130°-135° F = medium-rare, 140° F = medium, 150° F = medium-well, 160° F = well done
  14. Set your roast on a rack on the counter, and tent him loosely with foil. Let him rest like this for about 15 minutes to help keep him nice and juicy. He’ll rise to his final temperature under the foil.
  15. Transfer your roast to a serving platter. Cut off his strings and discard. For a nice presentation, surround him with roasted veggies or some fresh sprigs of rosemary. Enjoy!

Notes

What size prime rib should I get?

Portions are approximate, right? You never know when Uncle Larry is going to demolish half a roast by himself. Barring the occasional overly enthusiastic diner, count on roughly (raw weights listed below):

4 lbs. for 3-4 people 5 lbs. for 4-5 people 6 lbs. for 5-6 people 7 lbs. for 6-7 people 10 lbs. for 8-10 people 14 lbs. for 10-12 people

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https://www.thehungrymouse.com/2015/12/29/holiday-prime-rib/


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Jessie Cross is a cookbook author and creator of The Hungry Mouse, a monster online food blog w/500+ recipes. When she's not shopping for cheese or baking pies, Jessie works as an advertising copywriter in Boston. She lives in Salem, Massachusetts with her husband and two small, fluffy wolves.

1 COMMENT

  1. This guy has a killer recipe. It's as easy as 123. I've experimented a couple of times before thanksgiving, with great success. I am cooking a 22lb for thanksgiving. Tired of the same old meats. You will impress your guest with this one.

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